Victorian Hotel Explains Why the World Needs More Canada

What does a light bulb, telephone, artificial pacemaker, Robertson screw, Wonderbra, and a jar of peanut butter all have in common? They are all Canadian inventions. This year, Canada celebrated 150 years of Confederation. It’s an exciting time, and the staff at the Victorian Hotel in Vancouver have decided to celebrate by publishing a little article on what makes  Canada so awesome. Spoilers—there’s plenty of back patting ahead, so get ready.

 

Canada has long enjoyed a celebrated international reputation. From acting as brand ambassadors for universal healthcare to undertaking peacekeeping missions around the globe, much of the world sees The True North Strong and Free as a compassionate and welcoming country where the goodness is wrapped in Canadian bacon and drenched in maple syrup.

 

Being Canadian is synonymous with qualities such as friendliness, caring, freedom, honesty, health, and good governance. It’s the 7th highest ranked in the 2017 World Happiness Report, which assesses economic, health, and polling data, and averages it out over three years.

 

Naturally, as members of the tourism industry, everyone at the Victorian Hotel knows that this is outdoor land. The abundance of natural beauty is one of Canada’s greatest resources, and it spills into the city in the form of cool tree-lined sidewalks and glorious green spaces. Oh, and since the World Health Organization recently ranked Canadian air quality as the third cleanest on the planet, feel free to gasp in delight as you take in the city’s sights and sounds.

 

As one of the most multicultural countries in the world, Canada stands as an example that people from different backgrounds, ideologies, and belief systems not only have the ability to live together, but to thrive together. In fact, Canada was the first country in the world to adopt multiculturalism as an official policy in 1971.

 

Of course, like all countries, Canada still does have its challenges. For example, there’s the conundrum of trying to reconcile its status as an oil producer with sustainability practices, serving the medical needs of an aging population, and governing a nation of people that are increasingly diverse and complex.

 

However, the important thing is that Canadians have never stopped trying. This outstanding attitude often manifests itself in little ways, from a willingness to help a stranger on the street, to the super-friendly staff at the local watering holes and hangouts—including, of course, the Victorian Hotel!

 

It will be interesting to see what the country can accomplish over the next 150 years. And for anyone still wondering who needs more Canada, the answer is simply everyone.